About the Project General Company

Shared path to success

Proven

Twenty two years experience in Indonesia

Knowledgeable

Knowledgeable

Global Standard

PMBOK, Agile, and ISO 21500

About the Project General Company

We manage projects using PMBOK, AGILE, ISO and Hybrid methodologies as an outsource and insource provider of services. Portfolio, Program and Project. PMO Consultation

Four Attributes of a successful project management consultant

Client Relationship 

Management 

Credibility 

 

Successful consultants

 

Four Attributes of a successful project management consultant


The project General Company believes four attributes of a project management consultant: 


(1) a solid foundation in project management or a subject matter expert (SME) in a particular area of project management, such as a PMP® or AGILE, or ISO 21500; 

(2) demonstrated experience applying project management “best practices” in practical situations; 

(3) genuine customer relationship management (i.e., understanding the client’s problems, formulating recommendations, and implementing solutions); and 

(4) credibility   

 

As a project management consulting company, our services are based on providing our clients with resources with the appropriate knowledge and skills. We hire staff with educational and/or certification requirements. We look for candidates with a college degree in the functional area in which they will be working (e.g., information technology, health care, finance). Since we operate in government regulated markets, the PMP® is a minimum requirement for our project managers. Other certifications and credentials provide our clients with specialized knowledge, such as the Certified Cost Estimator/Analyst (CCEA®) from the Society of Cost Estimating and Analysis or the Certified ScrumMaster (CSM) from the ScrumAlliance®.

a solid foundation in project management or a subject matter expert (SME) in a particular area of project management, such as a PMP® or AGILE, or ISO 21500;

Client Relationship Management


The biggest challenge for many project management consultants is not applying project management knowledge and demonstrated experience in client engagements, but having to manage a client’s expectations. This involves another set of skills that are often difficult to master: 

Strong communication skills. Consultants need to establish open and frequent interactions with the client and have the ability to speak and articulate thoughts clearly and concisely. This includes being able to present well, to write clearly and effectively, and to listen actively


Proven problem-solving skills. When a problem is identified, consultants need to able to define the problem, identify and assess root causes, and develop recommendations that will address the problem and satisfy the client.


Managing client relationships also involves a different set of expectations and challenges. To be successful, the consultant will have to understand the client(s) and their roles in their organizations. Project General identified several challenges when working within a client’s organization:

Adjusting to the methodology. The client’s organization may have established project management processes and practices and the consultant will have to “align” with the skills and knowledge the client is providing. The client’s methodology needs to be followed and any “best practices” implemented needs to be in terms of the client’s processes and practices.


Understanding the organizational structure. The client has constraints and opportunities offered by the client’s own organization. Obtaining an understanding of the organization and the client’s business processes, organizational resources, and reporting requirements is an important part of the consultant being able to help their clients.


Understanding the organizational politics. It is important to know the world in which the client must operate so that the consultant understands how to successfully help their client.


Being the outsider. This could be a good thing, but it could be problematic. The consultant is often in the role of a “sword or shield” for the client—delivering unfavorable messages or defending the client’s position. If the consultant focuses on doing what’s best for the client, their work will provide better results for their organization.


As a project management consulting company, our success and continued business is based on sound client relationships. All new employees are required to participate in an introduction to consulting training. This helps sets expectations and provides new employees with resources for developing client relationship management skills. We use mentoring and coaching to help refine communication and problem-solving skills of all staff, but with particular attention to staff responsible for client interactions. We also use personal performance assessments, with input from clients, peers, subordinates, and managers, to identify strengths and weaknesses in client relationship management. Weaknesses are addressed through professional development plans. 

 

We also understand that client relationships are about personalities. We involve senior management in helping establish and maintain client relationships. This helps with the early identification and resolution of personality conflicts between consultants and clients.

Credibility


Credibility comes through relationships with clients who have become confident in the consultant’s abilities to meet their expectations. Clients appreciate qualities that all of us should be capable of providing: honesty, dependability, integrity, and hard work. By establishing trust based on sound relationships, proven project management capabilities, and the ability to meet their expectations, clients will share the consultant’s accomplishments with others, which establishes credibility. 

 

Credibility also comes from delivering value. Value could be measured by successfully delivering that project on schedule, within budget, and to performance requirements. However, when a consultant can help a client address their “pain points” while delivering that project, the consultant is now focusing on the client’s true needs. Consultants must develop the ability to identify and understand their clients’ problems, empathize with their pain, and find solutions. When a client asks, “What do you think we should do?” the consultant has established credibility in being able to help with what’s best for the client.

Successful consultants are:


As a project management consulting company, we know what it takes to be a successful consultant. In addition to what we have presented on this web page, here are several attributes we have observed in our more successful project management consultants: 

 

Credibility also comes from delivering value. Value could be measured by successfully delivering that project on schedule, within budget, and to performance requirements. However, when a consultant can help a client address their “pain points” while delivering that project, the consultant is now focusing on the client’s true needs. Consultants must develop the ability to identify and understand their clients’ problems, empathize with their pain, and find solutions. When a client asks, “What do you think we should do?” the consultant has established credibility in being able to help with what’s best for the client.

Confident—the consultant being able to successfully use the four attributes to deliver value to the client, continually, and be willing to assess and improve his or her skills and performance.


Proactive—continually assessing the client’s business objectives for potential impacts. By establishing sound client relations, the consultant can identify potential client “pain points” and prepare for possible solutions.


Innovative—taking proven practices and, with slight modifications, address their client’s “pain points.” Providing value by using common tools and techniques, effectively and efficiently, to meet unique client needs.